Guys using battle ropes on basketball court

Battle Rope Workout for Basketball Players Ups Your Game

You may not know that a battle rope workout for basketball players ups your game, but you will now. As sports science, research, methodologies and equipment improve, the ability to dial in your training is improving rapidly and giving athletes more control over how they push through to the next level.

You’ve undoubtedly heard all manner of things ranging from innovative to eccentric, your favorite athletes use to get the edge on the competition. Don’t worry, we’re not going to tell you to go jump in a hyperbaric chamber, a float tank or get deep frozen with a cryogenic therapy session. Although, I’ve tried cryo and float tanks and they’re definitely therapeutic, no doubt. I digress.

We’re here today to tell you about a much simpler method to take your basketball game to new heights- battle rope training.

Guys using battle ropes on basketball court

Battle Rope Workout for Basketball = Slam Dunk

As noted above, sports science and research has been improving exponentially. We’re actually reaching a point of over-saturation of training methodologies and equipment, making it difficult for academics to churn out research fast enough. Fortunately, in 2018, a group of researchers in Taiwan, conducted a study about the influence of battle rope training on basketball.

You might be thinking, “What?” If not, you already know that basketball in China is wildly popular. There already has been a steady flow of ex-college and ex-NBA players who’ve extended their careers going across the Pacific. Coincidentally, Jeremy Lin announced today that he’s headed over there, because he inked a contract with the Beijing Ducks.

The point is, don’t underestimate the passion for basketball in China. The Chinese love the sport, and its popularity will keep surging in Asia, so expect Chinese players to eventually land in the NBA. Maybe battle rope workouts are getting them noticed by NBA scouts. Here’s what that 2018 Taiwanese study found, that will get you noticed by NBA scouts too.

  • The biggest finding was the improvement of your overall athleticism. Yeah, that sounds vague right? You’re maybe thinking, “What, maybe I can shoot the ball from a farther distance?” No, much more than that. The study showed that battle rope training “…significantly enhanced multiple physical fitness dimensions, namely aerobic capacity, upper-body anaerobic power, upper-body power, lower-body power, and core endurance…” Umm…wow! That’s more than half of what basketball physically requires.

 

  • A battle rope workout for basketball also gives you more ups. Don’t ask me how, but battle ropes make you jump higher. The study found that battle rope “training significantly increased the vertical jump height from 45.61 to 46.78 m (2.6%).” If I was still in high school playing basketball, I’d be running out to the store right now.

 

  • It gets better. This will blow your mind. Battle rope training makes you a much better shooter. The study “…showed that battle rope training significantly increased free throw (pretraining: 66.5%; post-training: 75.8%) and dynamic 2-point shot percentages (pretraining: 36.7%; post-training: 50.0%)…”

This is amazing. I don’t know of, or have ever heard of, any other training method or tool that has such a profound impact on the hardwood. This tells me that spinach is to Popeye, as battle ropes are to basketball.

How’s Steph Curry for a Testimonial?

Maybe your favorite player is Michael Jordan, or Lebron James, or whoever. But I hear Steph Curry isn’t too bad. Would you put more stock into doing a battle rope workout if Steph did them too?

What if I told you he does a unilateral battle rope exercise and dribbles a basketball at the same time? This guy is something special.

I don’t think doing a battle rope workout for basketball can get any better endorsement, than from Steph Curry.

I think it’s safe to say his on-court results back up his training methods.

He’s a 6 time all-star, 2 time MVP and 3 time world champ. He’s got quality street cred, don’t you think?

I’d normally do a mic drop here, but let’s go a bit further and keep building a training regiment for you.

Battle Rope for Basketball Training

If you don’t want to copycat Steph Curry, or if you just want to get deeper into battle rope training by blazing your own trail, here are a couple of quality resources for all you ballers out there.

This first vid demonstrates some more basic movements, but cranks it up at the end with the Bosu ball. We actually found some similar movements incorporating Bosu balls and battle ropes in another blog of ours (#6).

Now this next video is where it’s at.

Much like the Steph Curry vid, the training in this one perfectly suits basketball players. You can clearly tell that this was custom designed for hoopers.

I really like the movements that incorporate both the battle rope and dribbling at the same time. I can see how this type of training pays off in such a big way.

Score Yourself a Buzzer Beater

The jury is in, and the verdict is a resounding “Yes!” Battle ropes do wonders for functional fitness, by way of explosive power that transfers over to other sports, like basketball, among others.

Between the significant improvements in shooting accuracy, free throw accuracy and vertical jump, a battle rope workout for basketball is an absolute must.

If by some stretch of the imagination, the jury is still out for you, jump over here for a simpler explanation of the 2018, Taiwanese study. This resources uses a basketball frame to better show the benefits.

Ready to get roped in, but don’t own a battle rope? Say no more, and click through to check out our brand new battle rope.

Finally, if you’re looking for training that’s a bit more general, and you want to lose weight while not doing boring cardio, check this out.

We super appreciate you stopping by to read our blog. By all means, please do share any and all of your battle rope training methods and tips, especially if you’re a basketball player.

Have a super day, stay awesome and go grab a rope.